Sheathing the Floor System

Subflooring has to stand up to the winter weather. Framing the house in the middle of a Kentucky winter means cold temperatures and lots of rain—conditions that shape our subflooring choice. We picked AdvanTech subfloor for two reasons. As I mentioned in my previous post, we want a stiff, squeak-free floor. We’ve found AdvanTech to be stiffer than...

Subflooring has to stand up to the winter weather.

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Framing the house in the middle of a Kentucky winter means cold temperatures and lots of rain—conditions that shape our subflooring choice. We picked AdvanTech subfloor for two reasons. As I mentioned in my previous post, we want a stiff, squeak-free floor. We’ve found AdvanTech to be stiffer than some other subflooring options. To make sure it’s a silent floor we need to prevent movement and gaps between the subflooring and the joists. The TJIs are one part of addressing this. The other is gluing and screwing the subfloor. The AdvanTech subfloor adhesive creates a strong bond between the TJIs and the subfloor that prevents squeaky floors. One thing we like about the adhesive is that it can be applied down to 20⁰ F and when the wood is wet or frozen. The framers spray the polyurethane foam-type glue along a 4 ft. row of sheathing, tack them in place and another crew member follows behind screwing down the panels. Our framers use Simpson StrongTie collated screws and screw gun once the subfloor is down. It’s easier on the body than bending over to drive screws, and it is a faster way to follow the best practice of gluing and screwing the subfloor.

The other thing we like about the AdvanTech panels is we don’t have to worry about the wet weather swelling the edges; edge swelling hasn’t happened to us with this product so we don’t have to sand before installing the finish floor.

With the joists in, the framers snap lines for the subfloor panels. The tongue and groove edges are self spacing. The 4-ft. panel ends are gapped 1/8 in.
AdvanTech Subfloor Adhesive is a gun-applied, moisture curing, polyurethane glue. The initial foam spray (above) quickly settles to a gel bead (photo below). They only spread glue as far ahead as can be sheathed and fully fastened before the glue cures–about 20 minutes.
After dropping the panel in place the corners are tacked and the next panel placed.
Another carpenter follows behind with collated screw gun. The Simpson StrongTie Quick Drive system is fast and ergonomic.
Source: www.finehomebuilding.com